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Man arrested at Windsor Castle, charged with making threats to kill Queen Elizabeth II, appears in court


London: A man arrested at Queen Elizabeth’s Windsor Castle home on Christmas Day wearing a mask and holding a crossbow told security “I am here to kill the Queen”, a British court has heard.

Jaswant Singh Chail, 20, who has been charged under Britain’s Treason Act, had spent months planning the attack and trying to gain access to the royal family, London’s Westminster Magistrates’ Court was told on Wednesday.

Queen Elizabeth II looks on during a visit to officially open the new building at Thames Hospice, Maidenhead, Berkshire, last month.

Queen Elizabeth II looks on during a visit to officially open the new building at Thames Hospice, Maidenhead, Berkshire, last month.Credit:AP

Prosecutors said Chail, from Southampton in southern England, recorded a video before he entered the grounds of the castle to the west of London where the 96-year-old monarch mostly resides. She was there on the day.

“I am sorry for what I have done and what I will do. I am going to attempt to assassinate Elizabeth, queen of the royal family,” he said in the video, in which he was seen holding a crossbow and wearing a face covering.

“This is revenge for those who died in the 1919 massacre,” Chail said, referring to an incident when British troops shot dead nearly 400 Sikhs in their holy city of Amritsar in north-western India.

“It is also revenge for those who have been killed, humiliated and discriminated on because of their race,” he said.

Police guard the Henry VIII gate to Windsor Castle, England. A man was charged with intent to “injure or alarm” the Queen after being arrested at the castle on Christmas Day 2021.

Police guard the Henry VIII gate to Windsor Castle, England. A man was charged with intent to “injure or alarm” the Queen after being arrested at the castle on Christmas Day 2021.Credit:AP

Indians have long demanded a formal apology from Britain for what is also known as the 1919 Jallianwala Bagh massacre, when British troops opened fire on unarmed civilians who had gathered to protest against a colonial law.

Elizabeth laid a wreath at the site of the massacre during a visit to India in 1997 and referred to it as a “distressing example” of “difficult episodes” in the past.



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